And watching? Definitely the Bulls with Michael Jordan. When he went up against Magic Johnson [in the 1991 Finals against the L.A. Lakers] and switched the ball in his hands on that one shot. I think about that, and the game where hit all those 3s against Portland [in the 1992 Finals]. Those are my favorites.

 

Carlos Boozer

When I was in college, it was crazy how dominant Kobe and Shaq were. That lob that Kobe threw Shaq against Portland and he dunked it and screamed, that was crazy. And MJ, when he hit the shot against Utah and his form was perfect – fundamentally sound. Moments like that stand out in your mind.

 

Jimmy Butler

Everybody remembers Mike, man. That crossover against Utah; everybody loves that. When you think about Mike you think, "Damn, he did [Bryon Russell] nasty!"

As a player, I haven't really played in the playoffs, but hopefully I can make some this year.

 

Sam Smith (Bulls.com)

To me, the most significant one was the Jordan shot against Cleveland. But it was why it was. Jordan had blown the game before [Game 4 in Chicago], a lot of people forget; he missed two free throws. Here you have the guy who's viewed as the greatest player ever missing free throws to clinch the series at home. Now it's going back to Cleveland, and it comes down to one shot. If Jordan misses that shot, I don't know what would have happened to that team. They would've been forced into big changes. That one shot had the biggest ramifications for the direction of the franchise and it was sort of the launching pad from there.

 

Michael Wilbon (ESPN)

Oh man, there's so many. Michael sweeping the Pistons in Detroit and seeing them walk off the floor; I was at all of those games. The game in the Finals against Magic and the Lakers; the one where MJ switched hands on the shot. The game winner over [Craig] Ehlo.

I'll tell you what, my favorite is when the Bulls beat the Knicks in [Madison Square] Garden and Jordan had the baseline dunk on [Patrick] Ewing. That's the one. Well, that and the infamous block, strip, block, block on Charles Smith in 1993.

 

 

Bryan Crawford is a RedEye special contributor.

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