Secret Lives of Dorks

Jim Belushi (left) and Gaelan Connell star in "The Secret Lives of Dorks." (Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures / September 25, 2013)

Jim Belushi has a movie coming out where he plays—you guessed it—an obsessed Bears fan. The movie, "The Secret Lives of Dorks," hits theaters Friday and includes a cameo from Mike Ditka, who in the movie stars in a DVD series designed for people who want to learn from Da Coach. (The series includes "Ditka's Guide to Parenting," "Ditka's Guide to Talking to Women" and "Ditka's Guide to Trying to Date a Man Obsessed with Ditka.")

Belushi talked to RedEye about the movie, his life as a sports fan and the backlash he faced for lifting the Stanley Cup.

So they sent me the screener …

Oh you got a chance to watch it.

I did.

It's a fun movie.

It's not really my style, but it subverted certain expectations I had about how the characters were going to interact.

I see what you're saying, but I gotta tell you, I watched it with my 14-year-old girl—a pretty snotty 14-year-old kid—and my 11-year-old son and my wife, and I gotta tell you, I was shocked. These guys were laughing. My daughter and my son had big smiles on their faces and their eyes were real open. It shows you how into the story they were.


Do you have any favorite personal Ditka stories?

I have a story. It's a little long, but I'll give it to you.

I was shooting "Red Heat." We were shooting in Joliet with Arnold Schwarzenegger. The Bears were playing the Giants, and I wanted to get out of Joliet to get to the game. It was a Monday night game. I was just anxious to get off the set, and the director said to me, "You're such a Bears fan, you should do a movie." He said, "Here's the movie. You're Jim Belushi the actor, and you're sitting with your wife, depressed. And she goes, 'What is it, Jim? What is it?' And you say, 'It's the Bears. It's just the Bears.' And she says, 'You know what? Why don't you just go play for the Bears? You know Ditka. Go ask him.' "

So I go ask Ditka if I can play, and he goes, "Sure Jimmy." And so I train with them for a little bit, and I'm going to be on special teams, and I run down the field, I'm on the right side of the field, and I get blocked out of bounds. But I'm the happiest man in the world.

So I tell Ditka this story, and he goes [big Ditka voice], "No, Jimmy! No, Jimmy! You don't get knocked out of bounds. You go right into the middle. You hit him low. You force a fumble. You pick up the fumble, and you run 10, 13, 15 yards into the end zone and you score! Because, Jimmy—[dramatic pause]—nobody remembers a loser. They only remember a winner." [Laughs.] I love that story.

In the movie, you teach your daughter to curse, which you say is part of good football watching. Were there any elements taken from your life as far as you watching football with your kids growing up?

Well, my wife is a very smart football wife. When I start watching on Sunday—and man, now you can watch from 10 in the morning until 10 at night—I turn around and everybody is gone. I don't know what she does, but she makes plans for the kids, and plans for her to be out of the house, because of my violent temper [laughs]—my bad language while I'm watching football. When you have young kids like that, it's hard to watch with them because you have to really control yourself. Always modeling. But when they're not there, it's a free-for-all. I have a couple buddies over here. We make sandwiches and watch and swear at the TV, and watch our fantasy teams. It's a great day.

There was one element that bugged me about the movie. There's a scene where your son comes in and he says, "What are you watching?" And you say "football." And he says, "Well, it's Wednesday." And you say, "It's an old game, from '85." And he says "The Super Bowl?" and you say "No." and he says, "A championship game?" and you say, "No, it's the Fog Bowl."

[Laughs.]

But the Fog Bowl was after the '88 season.

No! I thought the Fog Bowl was after the '85 season.