“They told me he was shot in the head,’’ said Mrs. Bradley, 65, who is also a bus driver for Sunrise and also worked for the U.S. Postal Service for 30 years.
 
“It’s nerve-wracking,’’ said Mrs. Bradley, who said she and her husband started working for Sunrise on the very same day.
 
 “I thought I’d find him with a big cut. He was scared,’’ she said of her husband. “He didn’t know where the bullet came from. Blood was gushing everywhere."
 
Joe Bradley said although he almost always sees a group of kids hanging at the corner, nothing like this has ever happened before and he drives the same route every day.

“Even little kids throw rocks at the bus,’’ Bradley said. “In the winter they throw snowballs."

He said he did not see the shooter but is sure the gunman was targeting the bus. However, police said it appeared to be a stray bullet and the driver was not the target.
 
Bradley says though he is left-handed, it’s hard to move around with the wound.

“I need help to brush my teeth and I can’t put my belt in the belt loops … it’s almost impossible,’’ he said.
 
But Bradley says he loves driving so much, he is hoping this will only be a temporary setback.
 
“This hand is so bad it’s going to be a while before I can drive. I like driving but this hand is not going to let me do nothing’’ for now, Bradley said.

Bradley thought for moment before answering when asked what he would say to the shooter, if he could.
 
Anyone who could shoot at a bus is "sick," Bradley said. "They don’t care because they could have easily killed someone.’’

Tribune reporters Deanese Williams-Harris and Adam Sege contributed.

rsobol@tribune.com
Twitter:@RosemarySobol1