Saturday's 90-degree temperatures made it the 39th day this year with temperatures that high; the record is 47, set in 1988, according to the National Weather Service. Saturday also was the 40th straight day with a high in the 80s or warmer, according to agency figures; that's the third longest ever behind 46 days in 2010 and 42 in 1955.

There's a good chance both of those records fall this summer – we've just entered August.

Dawn Rhodes, Heather Gillers, Kevin Williams, Rosemary R. Sobol and Jennifer Delgado contributed to this report.

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Twitter: @ChicagoBreaking

Thunder was the music and lightning the light show for a time this afternoon, causing the suspension and evacuation of the Lollapalooza festival in Grant Park while a powerful storm front moved through the Chicago area.

 

About 2 1/2 hours later the festival reopened, and the Chicago area began to clean up.

 

The incoming storm front caused the evacuation order about 3:30 p.m., and mostly calm crowds on Michigan Avenue gave way to yelling clumps of people sprinting towards the nearest shelter as a greenish-gray clouds devoured the sky and torrential rain began to fall a little while later.

 

Many festival-goers ducked into cafes and restaurants while others hunkered down at the North Grant Park Garage, one of the established underground evacuation centers.

 

"This better be an awesome storm is all I have to say," said Sara Grimley, from Kenosha, Wis., after leaving the park. For about an hour at the height the storm did not disappoint, with heavy rain and frequent thunder and lightning.

 

The festival ground in Grant Park reopened a little before 6 p.m., and the city announced it would close at 10:30 p.m. instead of 10 p.m. to provide organizers flexibility in reconfiguring the schedule and allowing more artists to perform.

 

Crowds began heading back toward the main gates as the worst of the storm passed a bit after 5 p.m.

 

Carolina Cole and her daughter, Angelina, were told that the gates wouldn't open until at least 6 p.m. and they weren't sure how to kill the time.