Suburban men charged with harassment

Dr. Jeffrey Frank, from left, Scott A. Arne, Jeffrey B. Hooper, Morris Kharasch. (Deerfield Police (Frank), Lincolnshire Police)

Three north suburban residents face charges related to two separate incidents of harassment of the family of a Lincolnshire neurologist accused of public indecency and his family, police said.

 Jeffrey B. Hooper, 45, of Lake Forest, was cited with disorderly conduct after driving up to the home of Dr. Jeffrey Frank on May 24 and shouting “predator,” authorities said.

 Morris Kharasch, 56, of Highland Park, who had been attending a gathering at the Frank home, was charged with battery after allegedly approaching Hooper as he sat in his car. Kharasch, also a doctor, was accused of making contact “in an insulting and provoking nature,” said Lincolnshire Detective John-Erik Anderson.

 Hooper “drove up onto the public way, stopped his car in front of the residence and began yelling out of his car, 'Predator,’ “ Anderson said.

 The detective said Kharasch “grabbed (Hooper’s) face, twisted his glasses and causing damage to the glasses.”

 According to police, a few days later, Frank’s neighbor, Scott A. Arne, got into a verbal altercation with Frank's wife. Then, after returning to his car, Arne shouted at the Franks' 19-year-old daughter that her “dad should go and kill himself,” Anderson said.

 Arne, 50, a dentist, was cited with two counts of disorderly conduct after yelling to the daughter from his car as she was jogging toward her home, Anderson said. Arne and Frank are neighbors whose backyards are adjacent, officials said.

 None of the men involved in either incident could be reached for comment.

 Frank, a prominent University of Chicago neurologist, was charged with misdemeanor public indecency and disorderly conduct stemming from a May 3 incident in which authorities say he exposed himself and was seen by minors at a hotel in Deerfield. Authorities have temporarily suspended his medical license.

 Frank pleaded guilty to similar charges in 2007, after Wilmette police arrested him for exposing himself in front of teenagers at Gillson Park.

 In a written statement he gave police in August 2006, when the incident occurred, Frank said, “I don’t know why I did this in a public place except that it is some wierd (sic) manifestation of my stress and some ‘positive’ psychological brief benefit from doing this in a high risk area,” he wrote. “I did not intend to have anybody hurt.”

 Police in Lincolnshire said Arne and Hooper had been warned previously to leave the Frank family alone. Authorities said several residents, including Hooper, had met with police to express concerns about children’s safety because Frank lives across from Sprague Elementary School.

 Police also had observed Arne on May 25 posting fliers on public traffic signs around the neighborhood that displayed Frank’s police mug shot and the word “predator,” Anderson said. Arne was not charged, but given a warning, Anderson said.

 “Both guys (Arne and Hooper) were given warnings to cease and desist and basically leave this guy alone,” Anderson said. “They were given explicit warnings to back off this guy.”

 Arne, Kharasch and Hooper are all cited with local ordinance violations.

 lblack@tribune.com