U.S. tennis players wilting in the Indian Wells desert

With the star of the day, second-seeded Novak Djokovic, advancing as expected Sunday, it seemed timely to survey the results of tennis players from the United States. This BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells is, after all, one of the country's bigger tennis events.

There is good news and bad news. Mostly bad, enough for the U.S. Tennis Assn., whose mandate it is to produce U.S. players, not to answer its phones for a couple of days.

On the men's side, the top-ranking U.S. player, John Isner, is still alive and kicking. He won his first match as the No. 12 seed, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (3), against a once-prominent-but-no-longer-ranked Russian, Nikolay Davydenko.

For the U.S. men, that's it.

There is Isner and 13 players who have already lost. And the men's competition is only through the second round.

On the women's side, the news is brighter, but hardly glaring. Lauren Davis, a 20-year-old from Ohio, ranked No. 93 coming in, won her second match, beating another U.S. player, Varvara Lepchenko, 6-0, 6-7 (2).

And Sloane Stephens, seeded 17th, will play a featured evening match Monday on the main stadium court against 11th-seeded Ana Ivanovic of Serbia. The winner advances to the round of 16.

For the women, that's also it. Ten others from the U.S. have departed. That makes the U.S. score so far in this event 3-23.

Isner, when questioned about the current state of U.S. men's tennis, said he rooted for the other guys, but that, as is the nature of the game, added, “Selfishly, I'm just worried about myself.”

Davis received similar questions and replied contradictorily.

“I think the American women are doing quite well right now. We push each other and motivate each other.”

A minute later: “We all try to focus on ourselves, for the most part.”

In the featured night match, Djokovic went down a break early against Victor Hanescu of Romania, but rallied, coasted through a tiebreaker in the first set and won the match, 7-6 (1), 6-2.

Fourth-seeded Tomas Berdych, the Australian Open finalist, lost his first match, going out against Roberto Bautista Agut of Spain, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.

bill.dwyre@latimes.com

Copyright © 2015, RedEye
Related Content
  • 'Great team effort' by joggers saves man in Lake Michigan

    'Great team effort' by joggers saves man in Lake Michigan

    During an early morning jog along Lake Michigan with his wife and children Tuesday, John Corba spotted a man struggling in the water nearly 30 yards from the shore.

  • Grateful Dead drummer dishes dirt, drug dependency in new book

    Grateful Dead drummer dishes dirt, drug dependency in new book

    As a founding member of the Grateful Dead, Bill Kreutzmann watched the world change from behind his drum kit, shoveling coal in the wildly tribal rhythm section as the Dead went from San Francisco underground curio to ground-breaking indie outfit, then progenitor of the improvisation-based rock...

  • Book comes out ahead of Grateful Dead farewell concerts in Chicago this weekend

    Book comes out ahead of Grateful Dead farewell concerts in Chicago this weekend

    The three clichés that color every good rock star story is “sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll." For the Grateful Dead, the trailblazing rock band known for its improvisational style, revelatory live shows and dedicated fanbase, there was that and so much more.

  • 10 best movies of 2015 so far

    10 best movies of 2015 so far

    The year’s half-over! How did that happen? No idea. With six months of a good year of movies in the books, let’s see how the Top 10 list is looking, with a quote from each respective review. Note: There are a few I’ve seen that I really like that haven’t yet opened in Chicago, and those aren’t...

  • If you make less than $50,440, proposal could increase overtime pay

    If you make less than $50,440, proposal could increase overtime pay

    Nearly 5 million more Americans would qualify for overtime pay under new rules proposed Tuesday by the Obama administration, a long-anticipated move expected to affect a broad swath of salaried employees from store managers to social workers to restaurant shift supervisors.

  • Chicago's minimum wage increase attracting workers to city

    Chicago's minimum wage increase attracting workers to city

    Unlike previous summers, UniStaff is experiencing a spike in job applicants at its Little Village location, a trend the branch manager says is tied to the city's minimum wage increase to $10 per hour beginning Wednesday.

Comments
Loading