RedEye

Rock the Bells 2013: J. Cole, Pusha T, Slick Rick among additions

Rock the Bells added a batch of additional performers to its 2013 lineup from younger voices J. Cole, Pusha T and Action Bronson to veteran hip-hop statesmen KRS One and Slick Rick.

The additions, which were announced Monday night, included more than a dozen acts across the traveling hip-hop festival's four stops.

Big Daddy Kane, Deltron 3030, Freeway, Girl Talk, Rapsody and 9th Wonder, Wale, YG, Riff Raff and Doug E. Fresh were also added to the bill.

TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts

For its 10th anniversary, the festival, which kicks off in San Bernardino on Sept. 7-8, will feature younger rhyme-slayers like Big Krit, Dom Kennedy, agile voices like Wu-Tang Clan, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Talib Kweli, Common, E-40 and Too Short -- and "original virtual performances" (as it's being billed) by Ol' Dirty Bastard and Eazy-E.

Odd Future’s Earl Sweatshirt is also on the bill, along with Kid Cudi, Hit Boy and rap supergroup Black Hippy, whose most famous member, Kendrick Lamar, became one of the biggest breakouts in West Coast rap in recent years.

At least one of the planned “virtual” performances has raised eyebrows. Ol' Dirty Bastard’s widow, Icelene Jones, filed a cease-and-desist order against the festival claiming to have full rights to license the fallen Wu-Tang Clan member.

Festival promoters said they intend to move forward with the digital recreation because they have the support of the late rapper’s mother, who appeared at last month's lineup reveal.

PHOTOS: Rock the Bells 2012

ODB will “perform” alongside Wu-Tang Clan, who reunited in full to mark the 20th anniversary of their groundbreaking debut “Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)” with a performance at Coachella in April and an album slated for later this year.

Eazy-E’s “appearance” will come during a performance from Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, the Cleveland hip-hop group the late rapper launched back in the early '90s. Bone Thugs reunited for the first time in more than 20 years at last year’s festival.

Nostalgia has long played a critical role in the festival that hits four cities on the West and East coasts in the fall.

For years the festival devoted headlining slots to veteran lyricists performing seminal albums in their entirety (Lauryn Hill, Nas, Cypress Hill, Slick Rick and Wu-Tang Clan have all performed classic works). Recent lineups have shown the festival deftly straddling old school with buzzy upstarts and current chart-toppers.

Rock the Bells will also roll through Mountain View, Calif., and Washington, D.C., and wrap in Rutherford, N.J., in October.

Follow @GerrickKennedy

gerrick.kennedy@latimes.com

PHOTOS AND MORE PHOTOS: Concerts by the Times PHOTOS: Unexpected musical collaborations PHOTOS: Musician feuds: The dirt & details

Copyright © 2015, RedEye
Related Content
  • ODB's widow files cease-and-desist order against Rock the Bells

    ODB's widow files cease-and-desist order against Rock the Bells

    When Tupac Shakur returned from the grave to "perform" at last year's Coachella, fans' jaws dropped. But the family of at least one hip-hop luminary isn't quite as thrilled about the prospect of a post-mortem show.

  • Chicago sues red light camera firm for $300 million

    Chicago sues red light camera firm for $300 million

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration has sued Chicago's former red light camera operator, Redflex Traffic Systems, for more than $300 million on grounds the entire program was built on a $2 million bribery scheme at City Hall that has already led to federal corruption convictions.

  • Marrow's 'The Gold Standard' raises the Chicago rock bar

    Marrow's 'The Gold Standard' raises the Chicago rock bar

    The four musicians in Marrow know quite a bit about bringing diverse influences to the table. After all, three of them, singer-guitarist Liam Kazar, singer-keyboardist Macie Stewart and bassist Lane Beckstrom were in Kids These Days, a now-defunct septet that combined jazz, funk, rap and rock in...

  • The Kids These Days family tree

    The Kids These Days family tree

    From its 2009 beginnings to its 2013 demise, Chicago's Kids These Days seemed like one of the most promising acts the city had seen in years. While the band split up at the height of its hype, its members have since gone on to do bigger and better things—seriously impressive considering the hip-hop/rock/jazz...

  • Solid 'Gold': How ex-Kids These Days members came back stronger as Marrow

    Solid 'Gold': How ex-Kids These Days members came back stronger as Marrow

    After the dissolution of Kids These Days, the much-buzzed about Chicago fusion-jazz-rock-rap septet that split in spring 2013 just a few months after releasing its only album, “Traphouse Rock,” some of its members spent what seems like all of 20 minutes bandless. "We were driving back from the...

  • Mr Twin Sister's 'In the House of Yes' is one of last year's hidden treasures

    Mr Twin Sister's 'In the House of Yes' is one of last year's hidden treasures

    Welcome to RedEye's "Song of the Day," an ongoing feature where music reporter Josh Terry or another RedEye staff member highlights something they're listening to. Some days the track will be new, and some days it will be old. No matter what, each offering is something you should check out. Check...

Comments
Loading
76°