Entertainment

What makes Henry Cavill super?

Many Americans first noticed Henry Cavill as the handsome Charles Brandon on Showtime's "The Tudors" from 2007 to 2010, but for most he's not so familiar--until now. Now that the 30-year-old has suited up as Superman in "Man of Steel," he'll be well-known all over the world. Here's what makes him so super.

Have you looked at him?
The eyes, the face, the hair--that body! Cavill, who worked out for five months before filming began and gained 15 pounds of muscle, felt obligated to "look like Superman," he said at an L.A. press conference. "So it really helped to push those extra few reps and just become that character."

He's British, get over it
For those fans still angry over the casting of a Brit as the most American of superheroes, we say sod off! Cavill worked with a voice coach to create a convincing American inflection. (Still, we'd be OK with him speaking the Queen's English; accents are sexy!)

He wears it well
"Man of Steel" director Zack Snyder said Cavill "exuded this kind of crazy-calm confidence" the first time he dressed as Superman. The ever-so-modest Cavill credits the textured suit. "[It] had a physical energy to it," Cavill told Newsday. "It was very special, and people would treat me differently."

He's been an outsider
Cavill said he can relate to Superman's loneliness and estrangement. "That was something quite personal to me," he told the Miami Herald. "When I was at boarding school, I didn't have many buddies." That might have had something to do with his being a chubby child. He told Details magazine that his schoolmates called him "Fat Cavill."

Third time's a charm
It's about time he's playing Clark Kent, aka Superman. In 2004, Cavill was the leading contender for the title role when McG was attached to a Superman project, according to The Orange County Register. That movie fell through, but evolved two years later into "Superman Returns." Cavill lost the title role to Brandon Routh. (That was probably a good thing.)

He's his own (Super)man
Cavill ignored past Superman performances, using the original comic books as his source material. And he chose "not to act as Superman," he told Reuters. "It withdraws from the whole reality of the story. You take the experiences of the guy, his fears of the future, his dreams of the future and you just apply that to everything you do."

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Copyright © 2015, RedEye
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