Now that we know legendary duo Outkast will play at 40-plus festivals this spring and summer, we can reasonably guess that the likelihood we’ll be seeing Lucious Left Foot and 3 Stacks in Chicago is high. Now, the only pertinent question that matters at this point is: Will Andre 3000 and Big Boi play Lollapalooza or Pitchfork?

Both have their appeal, but let’s break down the good and bad of both fests:

AUDIENCE
When it comes to audience, Pitchfork definitely is a more appealing option to catch a ‘Kast show. The fest tends to draw what you’d think would be a more informed audience (or at least one who can tell you what a Waxahatchee is) that would know and celebrate pre-”Stankonia” ‘Kast. The, um, energetic nature of a lot of Lolla-goers can wear on you. As frustrating as this is to write, Outkast is a legacy act. Will a kid who was only 9 when “Speakerboxx/The Love Below” came out have the passion (and the patience) to let the group rip through their greatest hits without yelling “PLAY ‘HEY YA’ BROOOOO, MUNDELEIN HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF ‘15 TURN DOWN FOR WHAT!”

SIZE
What Lolla adds to the equation is size. Lolla can allow for the group to have the massive audience they rightfully deserve to have without having a bunch of people on top of each other. Popular acts can make navigating the stages at P4K a real struggle. My co-worker Dana Moran agrees: “ After nearly being swallowed whole by the crowd for M.I.A. at last year’s Pitchfork, I’d only want Outkast to perform there if they’re guaranteed a gigantic stage.” Advantage: Lollapalooza.

So there you have it, but let’s be honest. No matter what, everyone wins when Outkast plays, be it at Pitchfork, Lolla, North Coast or the Manschewitz stage at the Yardbird Hootenanny in Charlotte.

Ernest Wilkins is Chicago’s wingman.

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