In my experience, when you're a Metric fan, you're a Metric fan. Five-ish albums of new wave and indie-rock, a song on the "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World" soundtrack, some beautiful acoustic sessions--you love it all. So waiting almost three years for some new material has been a bit brutal. You can only listen to "Black Sheep" and "Gimme Sympathy" so many times before they make you want to barf.

On Monday, lead singer Emily Haines and guitarist Jimmy Shaw posted the first single off the new album "Synthetica" due out June 12, called "Youth Without Youth." It may be a little more mainstream with a wider appeal than 2009's "Fantasies" or 2007's "Live it Out," but it's definitely still got that Metric edge to it that will more than satisfy die-hards. Think: glam-rock for twentysomethings wearing floral and combat boots who are pissed off about their student loans (me, I guess?).

But, seriously, it seems the band really had this group, specifically, in mind when putting this song and "Synthetica" together. In a commentary track included with the Soundcloud stream of the song, Shaw says, "We wanted to express some form of anger and resentment and sort of the feeling of being pissed off because you don't get to experience the youth that maybe you should feel entitled to." Follow that up with Haines saying, "Because you're born free," Haines added, "but still, that 250 grand in student debt really gets in the way of your ability to thrive, in the sense that the older generation is kinda selling out the younger generation."

"Youth Without Youth" has a stadium-esque bounce to it that will serve as the perfect opener at their Lolla set this summer, with Haines' seductive purr that easily turns into a crowd-energizer as the drums and guitars grow a little more anxious and, well, louder midway through the song. It's definitely angry, but in that "I just overdrew my bank account and have no food, so I'm going to go out and get maddeningly drunk and yell at people and have the time of my life instead of sitting home and crying about it" sort of way.

So if you're a broke twentysomething, feeling a little entitled and a lot pissed off at the world, this track (and forthcoming album) might be for you. In the commentary, Haines also calls the song reminiscent of "'70s sleaze" and encourages you to put on a tank top, put some gel in your hair and dance around. Well, if you insist.

Listen to the track here:



Behind-the-scenes video:



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