Good men? Guys speak out

Our article this week about what it takes to be a good man and The Good Men Project (http://www.goodmenproject.com) garnered several comments from our male readers.

"I really feel you have struck the chord as I have been talking about this subject of what it takes to move from boyhood to responsible manhood to just about anyone who would  listen to me  for the past 20 years," wrote Anthony. "It's really not that complicated, but it takes effort—something too many parents are either unwilling or uniformed on how to set the stage."

"Oh wow, an online community for men that isn't just about sexy women or getting laid," said Jerry. "Wish I'd known about these guys a while ago. Thanks for the tip."

"Bravo, Jen, for your piece on Tom Matlack and his Good Men Project!" said Tim. "I want to watch the DVD and will be getting the book too."

"I feel like I'm judged by other men all the time for being a stay-at-home dad," said Robert. "We are taught to have to DO DO DO, and that means less and less time with our kids. I wouldn't trade my 'career' for anything in the world. I wish more men could do the same."

"I am a therapist and I am seeing more and more men who are lost and depressed because of this very topic," wrote Mark. "So many males are afraid to show weakness. I try to tell my clients that it actually takes strength to get help. If more men could be honest about their struggles and stand up and say 'I am worth it,' this wouldn't be such a taboo subject. It's not 'macho' to ignore your feeling and fears. It's damaging."

"I think young men nowadays are too entitled and lazy most of the time," says James. "I was in the military, and I think that discipline and service is what makes for a 'good man'. Not to be too preachy, but many in the younger generations don't know what it means to step up and provide for a family. They're too busy playing video games and trying to 'find' themselves."

A couple of readers disagreed with James' view, saying that the younger generation is good at one thing – sharing their feelings.

"It's good to provide and be disciplined, but what men DON'T do is talk about their feelings," wrote Aaron."We need to tell those around us how we feel and what's important. That is what this younger generation is doing that my parents never did, and it should be applauded."

"My dad never hugged me," wrote Jon. "I hug my kids so much they are embarrassed when I drop them at school but I don't care. I want to let them know that it's OK for men to hug and show emotions."

What do you think?

jweigel@tribune.com

Copyright © 2015, RedEye
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