Peavy: lots of talk, little sense

Jake Peavy said he doesn’t know if he’s “100 percent (compared) to what I was four years ago,’’ but he’s still collecting 100 percent of that trade-choking salary, you betcha.

Peavy said he wants to pitch 200 innings, which is admirable, but also seems likely to mirror the train wreck that followed his four-inning relief appearance last season.

Peavy wasn’t done talking to Our Sox Guy Mark Gonzalez. Peavy is never done talking, even if he always seems to be done pitching early.

Anyway, the last aggravating thing is that Peavy said he has no plans to re-invent himself as a pitcher who wins on guile because “what I want to do is what I did in the past, or come close to that. That’s who I am.’’

No, that is not who Peavy is. In fact, I’m not sure Peavy knows who he is or what’s best for the White Sox.

What’s best for the Sox immediately is that Peavy speak the truth. Enough with the big talk from the big ol’ country boy. He’s always getting hurt, and just our luck that he never hurts his mouth.

Peavy hasn’t pitched 200 innings since 2007, back when Jose Contreras was only 73. In 2008, Peavy’s ERA was 2.85. In 2011, his ERA was a full two runs higher than the last season he was the pitcher he deludes himself into thinking he still is. Hel-LO, anyone home?

Peavy has only gotten worse as he has only gotten hurt. In 2011, Peavy missed April, gave the Sox a good May, and then allowed 52 earned runs in his final 86 2/3 innings of a season he couldn’t finish because --- ta-da! --- he was too halt or lame or everything. Connect the dots, Jake.

Peavy refuses to consider morphing into a pitcher who relies on guile and softer stuff the way many veterans have. He sounds insulted, I guess, that he might be labeled Jamie Moyer. Ask Mark Buehrle how bad a deal that is.

Peavy’s ego seems to be getting in the way of whatever faint hope the Sox have this season. So, after a spasm of honesty, what’s best for the Sox is that Peavy get a reality check. Look, pal, understand the kind of pitcher the Sox need you to be, not the kind that left the majors four years ago.

This is especially necessary in a season choked by Peavy’s bad money (not to mention Adam Dunn’s and Alex Rios’, so thanks for that, Kenny). So much bad money, in fact, that it cost the Sox the reliable 200 innnings from Buehrle and forced Chris Sale to reach that towering whip of potential now.

Just saying “Sale and Peavy’’ wears out the bullpen. Peavy averaged fewer than six innings per start last season. Coming out of the bullpen to join the rotation, Sale doesn’t figure to average six either. Philip Humber couldn’t average six the last three months of 2011 after a surprise first half.

Just reading that last paragraph, I believe two middle relievers went on the disabled list.

No wonder the Sox traded Sergio Santos. A closer figures to be optional.

But here’s the deal: Sale and Humber are still learning how to pitch in the majors. They’re still learning what kind of starters they are. Peavy ought to know what he is and isn’t.

Sounds like we might have Robin Ventura’s first closed-door meeting.

Copyright © 2015, RedEye
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